Can we call Ourselves Responsible Naga Citizens?

Can we call Ourselves Responsible Naga Citizens?

Somungla Khamrang, Assistant Professor, Department of Education

 

I would like to share my concerns and observations of the life and environment in general in Nagaland. Not to begin this piece by painting such a bleak picture of Nagaland nor is it to generalise people, but I’d like to offload some frustrations and observations here, in the belief that knowing our shortcomings is the first step to correcting ourselves.

 

Many people in Nagaland our land seem to are have become increasingly selfish. They enjoy adulation and love to be praised where there is actually no worthy or deserving space for it. Many people run after name and fame, while striving for fellow human attention. It is very upsetting to see the absence of discipline among many fellow Naga people. With the advancement of technology, people in our land are trying to cope up with the rest of the world and yet, sadly the quality of will and mind are still bounded and untouched, confined to living in a primitive shell. The latest gadgets, swanky, fashionable cars, sharp, suits and fine dress appear attractive. However, the whole gorgeous facade is diluted by insensible chaotic action, indiscipline and selfishness. For instance, we find the best dressed men in suits driving fashionable cars, smartly violating traffic rules. Many young careless people ride their smart bikes without having any sense of social concern. They modify their vehicles for louder sounding exhaust systems to get the attention of the people, while disturbing the residents and general public. Many educated and well-off people become irresponsible citizens without a care for other fellow drivers who are also stuck in the same traffic congestion, yet these people still try and and squeeze into the little space they can find to get ahead of the long line, and break the traffic rules. Our city is bothered by the insensitive restless drivers and haphazard management of the traffic authorities. Honking of vehicles is one of the most irritating and noise polluting means in our city. Despite the fact that they are aware of the tight and congested traffic which is immovable in the queue, they honk incessantly. The habit of rushing in the highway and, illegally overtaking others, despite the deplorable road condition is another poor habit of the drivers. All these create a very risky environment for the pedestrians as well as the nearby settlers. From the level of the ministers and bureaucrats to the taxi drivers and lay men, rushing and running all day through every available opening or space, no matter how constricted, in the highway is a culture in our land. Nonetheless, nobody reaches their destination early. It will be very beautiful on our part to at least have a sense of responsibility in the public space while we are driving. I believe giving way to those people waiting to cross the road or to park their car in the main road won’t delay us for too long. We should be more considerate towards one another, respect each other’s right and balance our privileges to make the situation smooth and friendly. Generally, people are losing the capacity of patience and to compromise personal interest for other people’s interest.

 

Most of the drivers in our land need to be educated on proper usage of their vehicles with traffic signals, dipper at night, fog light, hazard signs and other modalities. Fancy and expensive cars which are driven by the supposedly “cultured people” have a very bright and sharp ray of high beams, which blind those travelling and affecting their safety. Surprisingly, it is these “cultured people” who have the least sense of respect for the welfare of others. This is how they in a way become responsible for many night road accidents. To prevent any untoward accidents on the road, the State and District transport authority as well as the traffic controlling authority must check and regulate the proper rules with necessary measures to keep the traffic system safe and smooth. I believe that the Indian law under the Motor Vehicle Act and other related Acts provided for preventing and safeguarding the roads and citizens must be sincerely adhered and implemented in our state.

 

It is my belief that we can be compliant and regulate these offences only when we have a clear conscience and pure intentions through a spirit of appreciation and reverence. Understanding and valuing the social fabric and accommodating public responsibility in this swiftly transforming society is urgently required. The nature of human free will and independence of thought creates numerous patterns of types of human behaviour. The educated and civilized human being is generally expected to be more congenial and approachable, and it must be so. However, the standard of the general populace are found in contrary and is failing in what it should be. It is despairing that every human today witnesses the degradation of credibility, depletion of morality, overlooking respect and negligence of moral responsibility, detachment from spirituality, ridiculed uprightness and human feelings, dishonesty, and so forth. With the advancement of systems, techniques and trend in the existing society, we are supposed to advance in our propensity too. But the present generation has a unique standard of advancement, a standard of un-correctable, hypocrisy, petty mind and selfish temperament; unwilling to listen for change and improvement. Seeing the progressive yet detrimental human behaviour in and around us, it provokes and annoys the very peaceful manner of many citizens. Keeping in mind the decent moral liberality and exceptional sociability of our forefathers, the present Naga people have emerged like descendants of another race with a different social set up.

 

Degree of Thought is a weekly community column initiated by Tetso College in partnership with The Morung Express. Degree of Thought will delve into the social, cultural, political and educational issues around us. The views expressed here do not reflect the opinion of the institution. Tetso College is a NAAC Accredited UGC recognised Commerce and Arts College. The editors are Dr Hewasa Lorin, Tatongkala Pongen, Seyiesilie Vupru, Vikono Krose and Kvulo Lorin. Portrait photographer: Rhilo Mero. For feedback or comments please email:dot@tetsocollege.org.