Inconsistency syndrome

Witoubou Newmai

Two distressing issues that have not been sufficiently highlighted in the general discourse of our society are the issues of inconsistency and the lack of coherence in most of the campaigns.

 

As the plethora of campaign groups on myriad issues confronting our society continue to look askance at their conscious inconsistency and doubtful coherence, the issues are still treated as ‘an elephant in the room’ in our general discourse.

 

The choice of timing of the campaign groups on most occasions to show a surfeit of energy and enthusiasm on issues even fuels more doubts in the collective public psyche. Thus, the integrity of most campaign groups appears hampered by inclining, if not succumbing, to the choice of timing or heavy dependence on the mood, which is often political.

 

Accordingly, in such a situation, it wouldn’t be presumptive to ask whether the powers-that-be, in one way or others, are rigidly intermediating most of the campaigns.

 

The obvious inference is, our society is suffering from the ‘inconsistency syndrome’, and we need to take out malady in the public for intense discourse as part of a corrective measure.

 

To illustrate a couple of situations, if we say there are no “illegal immigrants” in our society because the latter’s criminal activities are absent at the moment, then we need to examine the cogency of our reasoning basis in our campaign against illegal immigrants. Or, do we say we are fine with the potholes which are dotting the highways and lanes today because we have had enough doses of complaints last year on the issue?

 

Our society has had enough of elements taking pride in being servile blue-eyed boys of the powers-that-be. This being the situation, the service of the loud thinking and yet silent observers to come to the broader opening has also become a matter of urgency. We have reasons to expect from this class of observers to present greater clarity of thought in the public discourse.

 

But most importantly, our collective expression should be to consider defiantly that, unless this period is not understood as the beginning of the shift from the presently dominant incorrigible elements, to a new consistent and cogent form of domination, we are in trouble. When such an atmosphere is achieved, our campaigns on confronting issues are unlikely to miss the entirety of the intended target.

 

This depressing situation of our society is real, and therefore, there is a need to subdue the situation with added urgency and importance.