Lectures and film screenings on NE indigenous peoples held in Estonia

Lectures and film screenings on NE  indigenous peoples held in Estonia

Award winning film by Oinam Doren, “My name is Eeoow” premiered at the event

 

Morung Express News
Estonia | September 12

 

“My name is Eeooow,” an ethnographic film shot in Kongthong village in East Khasi hills, Meghalaya was premiered during the second meeting of the lectures and film-screenings on indigenous peoples of Northeast India on October 10 at the Estonian National Museum, Hurda hall, Tartu, Estonia.

 

Directed by three-time national award winner Oinam Doren and produced by CCRT, the film recently won two international awards namely the ‘Tangible Culture’ prize in UK and the ‘Best Film by a young director’ at the Film Festival Della Lessinia held in Bosco Chiesanuova in Italy.

 

This film explores the musical name tradition among the Khasis in East Khasi hills and follows the journey of two married sisters – Shidiap Khongsit and Shithoh Khongsit whose children has to stay in Shillong for higher studies as the village school has provision for only up to class seven.

 

The movement from a traditional setting to an urban setting is illustrated when the archaic sung names comes into contact with new lifestyles characterized by modernity. The filmmaker tries to question what happen to the tradition of having musical names in the village when the children leave the village.

 

After the screening of the film, an audio conversation between the director, Oinam Doren and the audience was witnessed. Earlier before the screening, Professor, University of Tartu, Ülo Valk gave a presentation on the Khasi community.

 

The lectures and film-screenings on indigenous peoples of Northeast India at the Estonian National Museum was aimed at introducing and exploring the indigenous cultures of Northeast India which is made up of 8 states and has a population of about 45 million.

 

The event was organised in collaboration with the Department of Estonian and Comparative Folklore, University of Tartu and Asia Centre, and the Estonian National Museum.

 

There are about 214 different indigenous communities with as many languages, cultural practices and religions in the North East India.

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