‘Mutual romance’ blossoms into first ‘Nagaland Honeybee Day’

‘Mutual romance’ blossoms into first ‘Nagaland Honeybee Day’
Minister for Planning & Co-ordination, Neiba Kronu along with other central and state officials at the inauguration of the first Nagaland Honeybee Day in Dimapur on Wednesday. (Morung Photo)

 

It is the sweet rewards of spreading bee gospel, says NBHM

 

Morung Express News

Dimapur | December 5

After 11 years of working with “missionary zeal and mutual romancing” with one of nature’s best gift to humanity – the honeybees – Nagaland Beekeeping & Honey Mission (NBHM) on Wednesday observed the first ‘Nagaland Honeybee Day’ here at NBHM multi utility centre.

 

“Observing the first Honey Bee Day is the sweet rewards of spreading the bee gospel and encouraging people to take to the beekeeping profession for economic and ecological benefits laid down in NBHM’s motto ‘Eco Bee’,” said Chubanungla Shilu, team member NBHM, in a ‘retrospective’ introduction to the Honeybee Day.

 

Chubanungla admitted that the real learning on the various nuances of beekeeping was obtained from our seasoned beekeepers with their wealth of traditional knowledge. She said the traditional Naga beekeepers have played their part well by being the custodians, the conservationist and the producers.

 

She also said the industrious honeybees have come a long way from being the humble nondescript buzzer setting up homes in every Naga village to earning a slot in the tourist map of Nagaland, and even as Nagaland Honeybee Day gets incorporated into the calendar events of the Hornbill Festival, it has paved the way for showcasing “our rich bee culture to the wider world and popularizing our ’Nagaland honey’ which has attracted the taste buds of honey connoisseurs over the last decade. This is nothing short of bee tourism at its best.”

 

Minister for Planning & Co-ordination and Land Revenue, Neiba Kronu, the chief patron of the event, in his address said one of the top priorities of the state government, apart from roads and power, is sustainable development. Recalling a recent seminar which deliberated on “which areas we can perform and sustain ourselves,” the minister said during his stint as Horticulture in-charge in the previous government, he toured South East Asian countries to get an idea of “what we can give and what we can take.” Kronu said after the tour and surveys, honey emerged as the most viable and profitable product from Nagaland to enter the world market. He said Nagaland being rich in bio-diversity, especially in flora, honeybee keepers and farmers can reap maximum benefit. He said in some states due to lack of variety of vegetation and flowering plant, beekeepers have to shift their bee boxes often. Whereas in Nagaland where different species of plants and flowers abound within a kilometer stretch, local bee farmers do not have to shift bee boxes, he said.

 

The minister also informed that in his earlier visit to Delhi, he had told the central government officials that “What we cannot do, no need to impose, but what we can do, you should encourage and support.” Kronu said the state government had sent a proposal of Rs. 10 crore to NEC for promotion of beekeeping in the state.

 

“Let us gear up, prepare and go forward. How good will it be if Nagaland can be called the ‘Land of honey’-this is possible”, Kronu said.

 

Advisor, Horticulture Mhathung Yanthan, in his address said Nagaland is the first state in the country to introduce beekeeping and honey on a mission mode and stressed on the need to shift gear to take the mission to a higher level. Yanthan, who was also former team leader of NBHM, also said the symbiotic relationship between bees and human beings is very important.

 

Deputy Commissioner (Horticulture), Ministry of Agriculture & Farmer’s Welfare, Naveen Patle, who also graced the event said honeybees play a vital role in horticulture as bees are the main agents in cross pollination, which is essential to improve productivity of crops.

 

Earlier, chairman NBHM, Ntsemo Ngullie, delivered welcome address and chairman, Village Bee Keeping Committee (VBKC), Yakor Village, Tuensang, Longkhangba, also shared his success story on the occasion.

 

A cultural troupe from Nsong Village, Peren district, presented a bee dance. Deputy secretary and team leader, NBHM, T Imtiwapang, proposed vote of thanks.

 

Retrospective

“Observing the first Honey Bee Day is the sweet rewards of spreading the bee gospel and encouraging people to take to the beekeeping profession for economic and ecological benefits laid down in NBHM’s motto ‘Eco Bee’”, said Chubanungla Shilu, team member NBHM, in a ‘retrospective’ introduction to the Honeybee Day.

 

Real learning on the various nuances of beekeeping was obtained from our seasoned beekeepers with their wealth of traditional knowledge. Their innovative practices never failed to amaze us. Today, we accord our heartfelt gratitude to the beekeeping community of the state who has been laboring, even before our interventions to keep the rich beekeeping tradition of the State alive and kicking. Our beekeepers have played their part well by being the custodians, the conservationist and the producers. They deserve a standing ovation and further support from the government and the community at large.

 

The industrious honeybees have come a long way from being the humble nondescript buzzer setting up homes in every Naga village to earning a slot in the tourist map of Nagaland, as Nagaland honeybee Day gets incorporated into the calendar events of the Hornbill Festival, it had paved the way for showcasing our rich bee culture to the wider world and popularizing our ’Nagaland honey’ which has attracted the taste buds of honey connoisseurs over the last decade. This is nothing short of bee tourism at its best.

 

With the support from all stakeholders we can set new goals and continue our rendezvous with the honeybees and look ahead with bees as our future.