ZNP suggests expulsion of Chakmas who entered Mizoram after 1950

Newmai News Network

Aizawl | July 24

 

The Zoram Nationalist Party (ZNP) has suggested expulsion of “Chakma foreigners” who entered Mizoram after 1950. “It is the only way to bring a solution to the Chakma issue in Mizoram,” ZNP president Lalduhoma said.

 

“The Election Commission of India (ECI) allowed us to delete the Chakmas who entered Mizoram after 1950 from the state electoral roll. Accordingly, all Chakma foreigners who entered Mizoram after January 1950 should either be pushed back or expelled from the state to solve the existing fiasco. We should however, try to live cordially with the Chakmas who came before 1950,” ZNP chief Lalduhoma said while addressing a political session at the party office in Aizawl today.

 

The ZNP leader advocated for the formation of Action Committee involving all Mizoram NGOs and political parties to assess the Chakma issue. “The Chakma issue should be taken as national issue and all NGOs and political parties must join hands to tackle the issue,” he suggested.

 

Alleging that Chakma Autonomous District Council (CADC) was created in 1972 in violation of NEAR Act, 1971 and UT Act, 1971, Lalduhoma also suggested that experts should put themselves into comprehensive studies on the creation of the autonomous district and hence find opportunity to dissolve the council.

 

Coming heavily on Mizoram politicians for the “unabated influx” of Chakma people from neighbouring Bangladesh into Mizoram, Lalduhoma has accused them of harbouring the Chakmas and making them politically conscious.

 

“People who are responsible for bringing in the Chakmas and making them politically conscious are no other than our politicians,” Lalduhoma said. He also said that the Chakmas are never considered as citizens of India before and after Independence, and there were only 198 Chakmas in the country as per 1901 general census.

 

He then alleged that when Mizoram was under district council, some power hungry politicians in Tlabung area resorted to including Chakmas in electoral roll for want of votes. “This very mistake has helped the Chakmas to become politically conscious leading to their permanent settlement in Mizoram,” he stated.

 

He then praised former Chief Minister Brig. T. Sailo as the only courageous leader who was against the creation of Chakma Autonomous District Council (CADC).

 

“The leader (Brig. T. Sailo) studied NEAR Act, 1971 and UT Act, 1971 thoroughly. As per this acts, only the existing Pawi and Lakher regional councils are to be upgraded to district council. On finding that the creation of CADC which was not even a regional council, was against law, the leaders took measure to dissolve it,” Lalduhoma said.

 

The Congress on the other hand took different turn and opposed the PC government’s plan and asked the government to give equal treatment to Chakma as Pawi and Lakher, he added.

 

Slamming the Congress and Mizo National Front (MNF), Lalduhoma said that during the interim government formed by Congress combined with MNF, the resolution moved by PC party to dissolve CADC was sternly rejected by MNF and Congress in the assembly.

 

He also held MNF government responsible for the present Chakma fiasco saying that the Mizoram (Selection of Candidates for Technical Courses) Rules, 1993 was amended by MNF government in 1999 by including the Chakmas under category-I of the state quota. The Congress led state government was then forced to amend the 1999 rules in the wake of agitation launched by Mizo Zirlai Pawl (MZP) in 2015 by notifying Mizoram (Selection of Candidates for Technical Courses) Rules, 2015 which relegated Chakmas to category-I. The new amendment rules, however, was challenged by Mizoram Chakma Students’ Union (MCSU) through PIL accordingly which the Guahati High Court has stayed the new rules, he added.

 

“If the MNF government had not placed the Chakmas under category-I, the present problem on quota issue would not have occurred,” he said.

 

 



Share this post..
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn