Reconciliation vis-à-vis the Justice of Christ

A Dimensional Shift
Reconciliation is a dimensional shift. And our people vis-à-vis have taken the right dimension. We have struck upon a key cord that is braided into the  tapestry of moral and ethical values which the post-modern world needs much. This dimensional engagement has proved that the justice of Christ is the only justice above all that can bring about a regeneration on the inside. God is for us. Allow me to illustrate as best and briefly as I can.

Apologetics
The  recent tears enabled instrumentally by the FNR can be attributed only to the person of Jesus Christ. Khrishna cannot do it because re-incarnation  conflicts with grace. Buddha would simply try to ignore the suffering. Mohammed would keep on saying ‘insha Allah’ and no  more. This is why I am convinced that people from all religions including, I think the atheist Albanian president, turned up for Mother Teresa’s funeral. What did she do?  Nothing but to let the justice of Christ flow into the lives of anyone whom she came across.  This is how powerful and real the justice of Christ is. Our people have recently come face to face with it and tasted the reality. My prayer, therefore, is that our people shall be an exemplary testimony to stand out as the justice of Christ to all those who are going through similar struggles all over the world.
This in my view is what the core of reconciliation is – the justice of Christ.

Philip Yancey and FNR
Just recently I had the opportunity to meet Philip Yancey, a very renowned Christian writer and a journalist. He has written books like “The Jesus I Never Knew”, “Where Is God When It Hurts?”, “What’s So Amazing About Grace?” and many others. Billy Graham said of him: “There is no writer in the evangelical world that I admire and appreciate more.”

He had delivered a Biblically insightful talk on reconciliation the other night. So, I wanted to learn more as well as share what is going on in our land. It was a two-minute personal interaction and very forthcoming. He was very encouraged to hear of our reconciliation. When I told him we are playing football, he gave an inquisitive look as if he was asking me ‘where did you get this idea!’ He said that starting with ‘small’ things like football is the right way. He talked about forgiveness too. After that short interaction he summed up, “Amazing!”

So, that word amazing is from his mouth. And it is also my view that we are doing an amazing job.

KUKNALIM!

Taliakum