‘Giving back in whatever way we can’

‘Giving back in whatever way we can’
‘Giving back in whatever way we can’

Ronald Chasie, a Kohima-based techie who is currently offering free transportation services to people needing medical assistance during the lockdown period. (Morung Photo)
 

Since April 23, Ronald Chasie has been assisting transportation of patients in Kohima 

 

Morung Express News
Kohima | April 28


"I feel it is everyone's responsibility to contribute to society. The society has given us so much, we need to give back in whatever way we can," avers Ronald Chasie, a Kohima-based techie who is currently offering free transportation services to people needing medical assistance during the lockdown period.


Since April 23, Chasie has been able to assist the transportation to over ten patients.


Among them was pregnant woman from Pughoboto who went into labour on Sunday. 


On receiving the distress call, Chasie travelled 32 kms to Pughoboto to pick up a patient and her family. The woman was brought to Kohima and admitted at a private hospital where she gave birth to a healthy baby girl. 


The work is tiring, especially since he is also on duty at the Kohima Police Headquarters.


"People have often asked me how I am managing because I go to office daily and office work is really hectic. But thankfully, people have called me only during my off duty hours," inofrmed Chasie, who has also put a standby vehicle and a driver in case the transportation assistance is required when he is on duty.


The community service has also received numerous positive responses, with two of Chasie's friends who offering their support and assistance whenever required. 


"My contribution is only little. It is nothing. But this is purely, genuinely my heart's desire to help my people. I think those who are able, should come forward and help those in need. If you have a sense of belonging, if you feel Kohima and Nagaland is theirs, you will freely come forward and help," he adds.


While the humanitarian service can be tiring, Chasie finds comfort in what his mother remarks. "My mom told me that if you don't suffer, you don't receive blessings. Blessings don't come for free.”


A humanitarian who wishes to serve the society in what he considers a small contribution, Chasie believes that “if everyone has a sense of belongingness, service becomes an integral part of one's lifestyle.”